Scorpionfishes

Eastern Red Scorpionfish, Scorpaena cardinalis (Photo: Ian Banks). Eastern Red Scorpionfish, Scorpaena cardinalis (Photo: Ian Banks). Demon Stingerfish, Inimicus caledonicus (Photo: Ian Banks). Demon Stingerfish, Inimicus caledonicus (Photo: Ian Banks). Eastern Fortescue, Centropogon australis Eastern Fortescue, Centropogon australis Numerous species of scorpionfishes (families Scorpaenidae, Tetrarogidae, Neosebastidae, Apistidae and Synanceiidae) are found throughout Queensland waters, variously ranging from the deep sea, to shallow bays and estuaries. Almost all species have sharp spines that have well developed venom glands near their bases.

Several of the larger species such as the Eastern Red Scorpionfish are often hooked by anglers, while numerous smaller ones such as the Eastern Fortescue commonly feature in the catches of commercial fishing trawlers.

Some scorpionfishes are occasionally trodden on by waders with inadequate footwear, or inadvertently touched by scuba divers. The Demon Stingerfish is another species of this group and can cause very deep wounds with its extraordinarily long dorsal spines.

The handling of any scorpionfish should be done with extreme care, as a sting can result in severe pain.

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